What Is My IP Address?

IP Address Details

Your IP v4 address:

3.231.230.175

Your IP v6 address:

Your hostname:

Your user agent:

CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)

To check your IP address using a script, use this URL instead: https://whatismyip.host/ip4

Learn more about your IP address:

What is an IP address?

An IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a unique identifier for each device on a network such as the internet.

Its primary purpose is to allow devices to communicate with each other. IP addresses are somewhat comparable to a postal address.

In a common household setup, you may have multiple devices connected to a single internet connection through a router (or combination of routers). In such a scenario, all these devices would have the same public IP Address.

If one of these devices (e.g. your cell phone) is connected to the internet through a wireless carrier, it would have a different IP address than a device connected to your home router (and through a local ISP).

How do I perform an IP address lookup?

To lookup your IP address, all you need to do is use the tool at the top of this page.

Our IP lookup tool shows you your IPv4/IPv6 address, hostname and user agent.

How does my device get assigned an IP address?

When you connect to the internet, your internet provider (wireless carrier, local internet service provider, etc) assigns you an IP address.

There are different types of IP addresses you can get: IPv4, IPv6, static and dynamic. Keep reading to learn more about each type.

What is an IPv4 address?

There are two types of IP address protocols in use around the world: IPv4 (IP4) and IPv6 (IP6).

IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) was introduced before the huge growth of internet connected devices. It supports up to roughly 4.3 billion IP addresses, which may sound a lot, but isn’t enough to cover the whole world.

Each IPv4 address is unique and will usually look like this: 192.0.2.235. The address is separated into four fields of digits, with each field representing a 'byte.'

The problem with IPv4 addresses is that they are running out fast. With increasingly more people connecting to the internet around the world, there just aren’t enough IPv4 addresses for everyone.

What is an IPv6 address?

IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) solves the supply problem of IPv4 addresses.

Differently to IPv4, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses, which gives IPv6 a capacity of up to 340 undecillion IP addresses!

Here is an example of what an IPv6 address looks like: 2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334.

IPv6 addresses aren’t as widespread as IPv4 (yet), but if you’ve been assigned one then you should experience faster, safer and more reliable internet data transfers.

You should note that a device using an IPv4 address can’t communicate with another device (or server) using IPv6.

What is a public IP address?

IP addresses come in two types: public and private.

Your public IP address is the IP address that is visible to other devices that you connect to on the internet. It’s also known as the ‘external’ IP address.

For example, when you visit WhatIsMyIp.host, we can see your public IP address and we’ll display it in our tool.

Typically, if someone talks about an "IP Address" they are referring to their public IP address, not their private IP.

What is a private IP address?

Your private IP address is the IP address assigned within your internal network, for example at home or at your office.

If you have devices connected to your home or office router, the router will assign each device a private IP address. This lets the router distinguish internet traffic going to and from each device.

Importantly, when you visit an external website or open up a mobile application, only your public IP address is visible.

Private IP addresses look different to public IP addresses, and fall into these three ranges:

  • 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255
  • 172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255
  • 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255

To see your private IP addresses, you’ll have to log into your router using the details provided by your router vendor/supplier, or look at your network settings on your device.

Static vs. dynamic IP address

When your ISP assigns you a public IP address, you'll either get a static or a dynamic address.

A static public IP address means that your IP address will always remain the same. That’s unless you switch ISP, or you relocate.

For residential connections, most ISPs assign dynamic public IP addresses, meaning that your IP address will change over time - typically when your router reconnects to the ISP after a reboot or network outage.

Having a dynamic IP address doesn’t change the way you use the internet, but it does mean that every now and again that IP address will change.

How do I hide my IP address?

An IP address can reveal certain information about you, for example where you’re located (approximately) and what internet-connected devices you use. Your ISP or mobile carrier can also see what websites you visit.

If you’re concerned by this, you need to hide your IP address. The most common and user-friendly methods to do this are to use a web proxy, or a virtual private network (VPN).

A web proxy (usually available via a website or web application) lets you route internet traffic from applications on your device to a proxy server, and then on to your web destination. Proxies are typically setup on an application by application basis, e.g. a web browser.

When you connect to a proxy server, your IP address will change to one assigned by the server. This masks your true IP address while using a proxied application, and the websites you visit will only see the proxy's IP address.

A VPN is a better software version of a web proxy, which you can install and use on most devices.

Like a proxy, VPNs divert your internet traffic through a private server, which assigns you a different IP address.

Unlike proxies, secure VPNs will use sophisticated connection protocols (OpenVPN, WireGuard, etc.), and encryption (e.g. AES 256-bit), to further secure your internet data transfers. A good VPN will also ensure all of your internet traffic is sent via the VPN Server, ensuring all activity is anonymized, regardless of the application.